ReviewsCameras

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Review

The pioneering Canon S90 was the original progenitor of the new Canon PowerShot S110, which aims to expand on its predecessor’s popularity by bringing a plethora of updated and new features. The new Canon PowerShot S110 is firmly aimed at the professional photography enthusiast.

A newly built high-sensitivity 12.1MP 1/1.7-inch CMOS sensor, the newest generation Digic 5 engine, 0.2-second autofocus acquisition, and a 3-inch capacitive touchscreen with a resolution of 460,000 dots have all been bestowed upon the new small camera by Canon.

In addition, it has a newly extended sensitivity range that reaches a maximum of ISO 12800 when shooting at full resolution, compatibility with raw files, ten frames per second of continuous shooting, Wi-Fi connectivity, and 1080p HD movie recording.

Related Articles

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Build Quality

The new Canon PowerShot S110 is durable in its construction, as we have seen from cameras occupying the upper echelons of the Canon PowerShot range. It has a lightweight, compact body that maintains the good looks and user-friendly styling of the Canon S100. In addition, it has a higher resolution than the Canon S100.

The creative newcomer, which comes in either a traditional black or a modern white finish, is an improvement over the already compact size of the model it supplants by its more svelte profile, which makes it more convenient to carry in one’s pocket.

The Canon S110 retains many of its predecessor’s most essential characteristics, including its 5x optical zoom lens, which provides a focal range analogous to 24-120mm on a 35mm camera. This is one of the camera’s many enduring strengths.

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Performance

If you shoot in Auto mode, the Canon S110 will produce consistently high-quality images, with primarily correct metering and accurate colors, while still being punchy in most situations.

We did run across the rare case in which a brilliant sky set against a substantially darker backdrop might result in some clipped highlights. Still, on the whole, we were impressed with this tiny camera’s ability to handle high-contrast scenarios.

The camera’s rapid autofocus (AF) mechanism works effectively, quickly achieving a positive lock in various lighting settings, including bright and dim.

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Image Quality

The Canon PowerShot S110 is capable of producing photographs of exceptionally high quality. At ISO 80–800, the pictures were captured without any noise; however, at ISO 1600, there was considerable noise and a minor loss of color saturation. While ISO 3200 exhibits more evident noise and a loss of color, it is still completely acceptable, and even ISO 6400 does not suffer too severely. However, the new highest speed of ISO 12800 should be avoided at all costs.

Although there was a minor decrease in sharpness and an increase in noise at ISO 1600-12800 compared to the matching JPEGs, the RAW files were relatively clean from an ISO range of 80 to 800.

The Canon PowerShot S110 handled chromatic aberrations competently, with very modest purple fringing effects seen in high contrast conditions and typically towards the corners of the frame. These effects appeared only when the camera was exposed to high levels of contrast.

At the 24mm wide-angle setting, the lens has a certain degree of barrel distortion, in addition to a general blurring of detail toward the corners of the frame. Although there is significant vignetting at 24 millimeters, the built-in flash performed admirably inside, preventing red-eye and providing enough exposure overall. The night snapshot turned out wonderfully, and the maximum shutter speed of 15 seconds was more than adequate for most shots taken after dark.

The image stabilization technology performs exceptionally well when the camera is held by hand in low-light settings or when the telephoto end of the zoom range is being utilized. The macro performance is relatively strong, allowing you to focus on the topic from a distance as near as three centimeters.

The pictures came from the Canon PowerShot S110 with the default sharpening setting. For the best results, you should perform additional sharpening in an application such as Adobe Photoshop; alternatively, you can change the camera’s location. The images were soft when they were first taken with the camera.

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Specs

Body typeUltracompact
Max resolution4608 x 3456
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors17 megapixels
Sensor size1/2.3″ (6.17 x 4.55 mm)
Sensor typeBSI-CMOS
ProcessorDigic 5
ISOAuto 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Focal length (equiv.)24–120 mm
Optical zoom
Maximum apertureF2.7–5.9
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3″
Screen dots461,000
Minimum shutter speed15 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/2000 sec
Built-in flashYes
Flash range3.50 m
USBUSB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionNB-11L
Weight (inc. batteries)135 g (0.30 lb / 4.76 oz)
Dimensions93 x 57 x 20 mm (3.66 x 2.24 x 0.79″)

Canon PowerShot 110 HS Verdict

On the surface, the Canon PowerShot S110 provides a relatively minor upgrade over the older Canon S100; however, a few new additions, particularly its responsive touchscreen, do make a real difference to the overall handling and performance offered by the new camera. These new additions set the Canon PowerShot S110 apart from its predecessor.

This new addition to the camera’s feature set is a positive one that enhances the device’s usability, even though the sensitivity of the screen and its placement on the back panel can result in the occasional accidental activation of on-screen options. However, on the whole, this improvement is a welcome one that makes the camera more useful.

The Canon S110 creates a favorable impression because of its attention to detail in areas such as the on-screen virtual dial, which makes excellent use of the versatility afforded by the widely used lens control dial and the well-balanced provision of automatic, creative, and manual exposure modes that are available. Both of these aspects contribute to the camera’s overall appearance.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button