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Nikon D3200 Review

2011 was a banner year for Nikon, as seen by the company’s dominance atop the sales rankings for both DSLR and compact cameras. The former was made possible by the Nikon D3100, the company’s entry-level product, and features a sensor with 14.2 million pixels. This camera is an excellent choice for anyone interested in becoming more serious about their photography.

As a result of the introduction of the Nikon D3300 and D3400, the D3200 is becoming increasingly difficult to locate.

Nikon D3200 Features

The Nikon D3200 has a relatively compact body, yet it still manages to put a lot of fascinating technology inside of it. These technologies have been trickling down from Nikon’s more costly cameras.

These include features such as the Expeed 3 processing engine, which claims to give speedier processing, less noise, and a choice of frame rates for recording Full HD video. Other features include recording Full HD video at various frame rates.

But the 24.2 million-pixel sensor is almost certainly going to be the feature that gets the most attention, especially considering that this announcement comes only a few short weeks after Nikon unveiled its other high-resolution camera, the Nikon D800 (with 36 million pixels).

Nikon D3200 Build Quality

The Nikon D3200 follows in the footsteps of its predecessor, the Nikon D3100, but features several ergonomic enhancements that are highly beneficial to the average photographer.

On the Nikon D3200, there are a limited number of direct control buttons; nevertheless, to access frequently used features (such as the sensitivity settings), users may press the I quick menu button, which is located on the back of the camera.

Even though it is a relatively small camera, the deep grip offers a reasonable degree of purchase. The Nikon D3200 has a look and feel of a high-quality piece of equipment due to the substantial amount of weight contributed by both the camera and the standard 18-55mm kit lens.

Nikon D3200 Autofocus

You can let the camera select an autofocus point for you from among its 11 available points, or you may change it so that you choose the AF point manually instead. Because this is a somewhat more complicated procedure, this choice is slightly tucked away in the menu, which may be somewhat aggravating.

However, when it has been chosen, the focusing point can be moved using the buttons that are typically used for navigation.

The autofocus acquisition time is often very swift, however, it does slow down slightly in low-light conditions. Other than that, the system handles itself rather capably. Even while the autofocus speed of the Nikon D3200 is slower than that of some other DSLRs, the camera should still be easy enough for the ordinary photographer to operate in everyday day-to-day shooting situations.

When using Live View, quick phase detection is replaced with a slower contrast detection technique. Therefore the focus will be noticeably slower as a result. This is something that should be kept in mind. Some photographers, especially those accustomed to the rapid shooting rates of tiny cameras, can find this frustrating.

Nikon D3200 Performance

The initial reactions regarding the performance of the Nikon D3200 have been positive, and we believe that the beginning photographer will find this camera very appealing. They won’t have to upgrade too rapidly as they acquire expertise because it offers a few features that fans will also see to their liking in the product.

The automated white balance function of the camera seems to perform an excellent job of assessing the scene, and it delivers mainly correct results.

If you believe that this could be an issue, you always have the option to adjust the white balance settings inside the camera itself. However, there are some daytime scenarios in which the camera produces slightly colder photographs than what would be ideal.

Nikon D3200 Image Quality

When the number of pixels on the sensor increases, there is a more significant possibility of a rise in picture noise. According to Nikon, the noise levels are approximately the same as those from the 14.3-megapixel Nikon D3100. However, the performance may be somewhat worse in some highly uncommon circumstances.

Thankfully, the results of our tests have shown that the Nikon D3200 is a significant improvement in terms of performance over its predecessor.

Noise is often effectively managed even when shooting at high sensitivities, such as ISO 1600. When viewing photographs at 100%, you may see some smoothness in areas where noise control has been applied in JPEG files. This is because of the implementation of noise control.

Again, it is essential to consider the target demographic and the possibility (or impossibility) of huge printing, even though any cropping would amplify the existing levels of background noise.

Nikon D3200 Specs

Body typeCompact SLR
Sensor
Max resolution6016 x 4000
Other resolutions4512 x 3000, 3008 x 2000
Image ratio w:h3:2
Effective pixels24 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors25 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.2 x 15.4 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorExpeed 3
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400 (12800 with boost)
Boosted ISO (maximum)12800
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes (1)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal, Basic
File formatNEF (RAW): 12 bitJPEG
Optics & Focus
AutofocusContrast Detect (sensor)Phase DetectMulti-areaSelective single-pointTrackingSingleContinuousFace DetectionLive View
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points11
Lens mountNikon F
Focal length multiplier1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3″
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT LCD with 160° viewing angle
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentamirror)
Viewfinder coverage95%
Viewfinder magnification0.8× (0.53× 35mm equiv.)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modesProgrammed auto with flexible program (P)Shutter-priority (S)Aperture priority (A)Manual (M)
Scene modesPortraitLandscapeChildSportsClose-UpNight portrait
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless plus sync connector)
Flash modesAuto, Red-Eye, Slow, Red-Eye Slow, Rear curtain
Flash X sync speed1/200 sec
Drive modesSingle frameContinuousSelf-timer2s Delayed remoteQuick-response remoteQuiet shutter release
Continuous drive4.0 fps
Self-timerYes
Metering modesMultiCenter-weightedSpot AF-area
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30,25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 424 (30, 25 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
Videography notesFrame rates of 30p (actual frame rate 29.97 fps) and 60p (actual frame rate 59.94 fps) are available when NTSC is selected for video mode; 25p and 50p are available when PAL is selected for video mode; Actual frame rate when 24p is selected is 23.976 fps
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-I compliant
Storage includedNone
Connectivity
USBUSB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
WirelessOptional
Wireless notesWU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter
Remote controlYes (Optional)
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion EN-EL14 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)540
Weight (inc. batteries)505 g (1.11 lb / 17.81 oz)
Dimensions125 x 96 x 77 mm (4.92 x 3.78 x 3.03″)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

Nikon D3200 Final verdict

The revolutionary Nikon Guide Mode was carried over from the D3100 and is a beautiful advantage for novices trying to get more creative with their photography. In addition, the Nikon D3200 has alternatives for those who wish to explore manual and semi-manual exposure settings further down the road.

The D3300 and the D3400 have now superseded it, so unless you can locate the D3200 for a truly unbeatable price, your best chance is to select any of these two models instead. Or, if you have a bit more room in your budget, you might want to consider either the D5300 or the D5500; these models include displays that can be angled in different directions.

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